Tag Archives: Serbian Dance

Timber Ridge and beyond

Another great year at the Labor Day Camp at Timber Ridge. Dance, sing and play ’til you drop!!
Go to http://www.dancingplanetproductions.com/dancecamp.htm to see what you missed!

A big THANK YOU to Betsy and Jamie Platt!

I was able to start the third part of the BIRD Project, which is interviewing folk dancers about their experiences folk dancing. Thank you to all that participated.

Susan O. is teaching Pembe a Macedonian dance. The one on Youtube is near to the one that we dance.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2qvxvY7lq4&feature=related
There is also a Serbian dance of the same name but different music.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qj2E-S_x3dU

Please forward this blog to your dancing friends!
Happy Dancing!
Another Day, Another Dance

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Serbian Dancers on Jay Leno

Did anyone see Novak Djokovic, the world’s reigning top tennis player (from Serbia), on Jay Leno the other night. He brought with him some Serbian dancers!

Here is a clip of that:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xpnHiVMxb7k

International Folk Dance needs some more publicity like this!

Please share this blog!

Keep on Dancing!

Another Day, Another Dance!

Opsa “tidbit”

Thank you Susan J for this “tidbit”!

Notes on the dance Opsa, which we did Wednesday, April 6.
(Andrew Carnie is a folk-dancer in Tucson, who has done some fairly extensive cataloging of various things IFD-related. Dick Crum is a well-known and -honored folk dance teacher of many decades (passed away several years ago).

Notes by Andrew Carnie July 19, 2003 based on notes by Dick Crum, July 1994.
Here’s what Dick Crum had to say about this dance:

“Opsa (OHP-sah) is currently one of the most popular dances at Croatian & Serbian dance events in the major cities of the Upper Midwest & the Pennsylvania/Ohio area. Its melody is relatively recent, having been composed & recorded in former Yugoslavia about a decade ago. The origins of the dance per se are obscure – it seems to have arisen here in the U.S., possibly around Pittsburgh. On the other hand, its structure has the same 5-measure pattern as the old Serbian Vranjanka. I first saw learned it at the Tamburitza Extravaganza weekend in Los Angeles, 1993, where tamburitza players & fans of tamburitza music from all over the U.S. had gathered, and Opsa was played & danced dozens of times.”

Translation:
1. Let’s dance this kolo — everyone loves it. It moves so freely & easily, everyone can dance it.
Refrain: You can hear the girls shouting: “Opsa!* Dance!” The boys won’t be outdone – they want to dance faster, more together & better — dance till dawn, opsa!
2. Let’s dance this kolo — everyone loves it. Boys, girls, everybody join the kolo, wind it around.
3. Let’s dance this kolo — everyone loves it.
The zurlas** are wailing, the drum is beating, and the dancers are on a high. * opsa! – spontaneous exclamation often used while dancing (no exact English translation; something like ‘whee!’, ‘yippee!’, or ‘hee-haw!’
** zurla (zoor’-lah) – shawm-like folk instrument common in southern Serbia, Macedonia, & other southern Balkan countries. Usually played in pairs with accompaniment by a drum (bubanj, tapan, etc.)

Thank you again Susan for the above info.

Below are Youtube videos of the dance:
:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7KKur2euYao

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7KKur2euYao

The dance notes are at this site:
http://dingo.sbs.arizona.edu/~carnie/folkdance/PDFs/Opsa.pdf”>http://dingo.sbs.arizona.edu/~carnie/folkdance/PDFs/Opsa.pdf

Please pass this blog along to your folk dance friends!

Happy Dancing!
Another Day, Another Dance!

Orijent, Ooska Gooska

Since last blogging, the Charlottesville International Folk Dancers had a great turn out at their first Saturday night dance. They plan to continue having a monthly Saturday night dance party.

The last weeks we have been learning the Serbian Dance Orijent

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kn148XeIxm0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NuADtEVbOgk&NR=1

In both of the above videos the groups do not put out their arms the way that Susan is teaching. Susan did admit that she has never seen it done this way, but the notes from Dick Crum discribe the way she is teaching it.
Sue C. taught Ooska Gooska, but I couldn’t find anything on the web demonstrating the dance.
Bill just happened to be in Ohio on Business and was able to attend the Greek dance teaching with Kyriakos Moisidis. He had a great time.
Have a great time dancing and forward this site to your friends.
Another Day, Another Dance!

Electric Slide

A small group this week only 8 die hard dancers. The 3 Susans(reminds me of The 3 Doctors-any Doctor Who fans out there?) were not available this week. Dances taught and reviewed this week by yours truly were Ersko Kolo http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_wf06vizughttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_wf06vizug ,
Electric Slide http://ric06379.tripod.com/id6.html ,
Hava Nagila http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ewFLSBJ8NkA&feature=related and a dance I choreographed to Esteban’s Mediterana.

If any dance should be made the “official American Folk Dance”, it should be the Electric Slide – in my humble opinion. It is the only dance that I’ve seen people of all ages get up and dance to on a regular basis.

The Hava Nagila taught in the above video is different than the one that I’ve done. If I teach again this week, I’ll add the steps that are in this version. There is more variety.

Happy Dancing,
Another Day, Another Dance